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Thread: Shooting into the sun

  1. #1

    Shooting into the sun

    Hi,

    I'm trying to improve my landscape and have reviewed some of my early morning and evening shots. I'm not sure about the exposure though. Any tips on shooting into the sun.????

    Wheeler

  2. #2

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    Re: Shooting into the sun

    Quote Originally Posted by Wheeler View Post
    Hi,

    I'm trying to improve my landscape and have reviewed some of my early morning and evening shots. I'm not sure about the exposure though. Any tips on shooting into the sun.????

    Wheeler
    I suppose the simple answer is . . . don't do it.

    At least not with any auto settings. Each occasion is different but I would say one of the most important items is to meter around the scene (spot metering often helps to point out potential problem areas) then manually choose something which will suit what you intend to achieve.

    If you do use one of the semi auto controls a bit of exposure compensation often 'saves the day'.

    And don't trust the display screen to give an accurate representation of what the final edited image will look like.

    ps. a couple of examples would help to give more specific replies.
    Last edited by Geoff F; 19th February 2012 at 05:54 PM. Reason: extra line

  3. #3

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    Re: Shooting into the sun

    I'm guessing that you're meaning "shooting towards the light" as opposed to "shooting into the sun"?

    If so then the #1 rule is "turn on your highlight alert feature, and use exposure compensation so that you push the exposure to the very limit" (until you start to get a few "blinkies"). Basically, shooting into the light puches the dynamic range capability of the sensor to the limit (or rather it needs to if you want to retain foreground detail without excessive noise), so you need to use all of the sensor's dynamic dange capability and then reveal shadow detail in post-processing.

    Using a GND filter is another technique for achieving this.

    This is probably as good an example as any ...

    Shooting into the sun

  4. #4

    Re: Shooting into the sun

    Hi,

    Thanks for the advice. I found it really helpful. I can see the improvement already.

    Ciaran

  5. #5
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    Marty Johnston

    Re: Shooting into the sun

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    This is probably as good an example as any ...

    Shooting into the sun
    That is one FABULOUS picture! I'd happily hang that on my wall and look at it every day!

  6. #6

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    Re: Shooting into the sun

    Quote Originally Posted by Wheeler View Post
    Hi,

    Thanks for the advice. I found it really helpful. I can see the improvement already.

    Ciaran
    If it was my advice, then you're very welcome. There are also lots of other techniques, but we'll wait until you're ready!

  7. #7

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    Re: Shooting into the sun

    Quote Originally Posted by Marty View Post
    That is one FABULOUS picture! I'd happily hang that on my wall and look at it every day!
    Thanks Marty,

    I don't think it's my best work, but off memory, I think there are about 6 or 7 22 x 44" canvas prints of it hanging in customers offices around the country.

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