Helpful Posts Helpful Posts:  0
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    66
    Real Name
    Dave

    Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    Dear Folks:
    I am tasked with shooting interior shots of "people in motion." The "motion" includes folks shaking hands, presentations of plaques, medals, etc during retirement and/or promotion ceremonies. The lighting in the room is overhead fluorescent lights. I use a Canon 40D. The lens I am using is a Canon 18-55. I seem to miss the handshake, get the people when their eyes are closed, etc. I am usually shooting single shot.

    Please offer some suggestions for improvement. Should I be using burst mode? Shoot on aperture priority using high ISO? Or just set camera to "P"?

    Thanks in advance to all who respond.


    Dave

  2. #2
    Glenn NK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Victoria BC
    Posts
    1,510

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    Dave:

    I would start with burst shooting. However, anticipation is your best ally. With practice you will learn to sense when to shoot before it's too late. I set my (30D) camera to AI Servo, use only the centre focus point, and I use the "star" button under my right thumb to focus the lens (not the shutter button). I keep the "star" button depressed so that focus is continuous. Actually I have my 5DII set up the same way. This technique was discussed at great length several years ago on a POTN thread, and most people that tried it liked it and stayed with it.

    http://photography-on-the.net/forum/...r+button+focus

    In particular note post number 6 by cecilc.

    Glenn

  3. #3
    Shadowman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    30,414
    Real Name
    John

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    Quote Originally Posted by acroreef View Post
    Dear Folks:
    I am tasked with shooting interior shots of "people in motion." The "motion" includes folks shaking hands, presentations of plaques, medals, etc during retirement and/or promotion ceremonies. The lighting in the room is overhead fluorescent lights. I use a Canon 40D. The lens I am using is a Canon 18-55. I seem to miss the handshake, get the people when their eyes are closed, etc. I am usually shooting single shot.

    Please offer some suggestions for improvement. Should I be using burst mode? Shoot on aperture priority using high ISO? Or just set camera to "P"?

    Thanks in advance to all who respond.


    Dave
    Have you tried this type of photography before? Any examples?

    Regarding getting people with their eyes closed, shoot more than one frame per person.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    South Devon, UK
    Posts
    11,634

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    The easy part of this answer is do not use P mode.

    Can I assume that you don't want or can't use flash which is likely to be the simplest solution.

    In which case you have to decide between Tv or Av. For posed shots I would favour Av because the depth of field is more important, providing you don't have so slow a shutter speed that you get camera shake.

    However, if you are faced with quick action shots you may find that the need to consistently have a reasonably fast shutter may cause Tv to be the better choice, and chance getting part of the scene out of focus.

    You may have to keep changing the ISO as your lighting changes in order to maintain a suitable balance between shutter speed and aperture.

    Shooting bursts can help sometimes but you do run a risk that the camera is processing a burst when you should be shooting. Generally, I prefer to manually do a succession of quick shots but there are reasons for both methods.

    Predicting when to shoot a scene is part of what makes a great photographer. I often get a similar dilemma when photographing insects.

    The other things I would say about lighting is to try for a position where the light is mostly behind you, but not at an angle which is making the subjects squint as they look into a strong light. And also try to avoid shadows creating 'dark eyes'.

    And under those conditions, you may find that setting your White Balance correctly will help with processing. Ideally, do a Custom White Balance, although this can sometimes work against you if you are having to quickly move around and shoot from different angles.

    Shooting Raw always gives you a second chance on WB. Particularly as with this sort of shot you only get one chance to get everything correct. It can be embarrassing when you get it wrong with 'good equipment' while someone taking a quick snap with a point and shoot camera gets better results. But many of us have been in that situation.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Nottingham.UK
    Posts
    409
    Real Name
    Martyn

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    when i shoot low light moving subjects i tend to use high speed burst mode but only fire off two shots,more often than not the second picture is the better of the two,
    if you use tv or av mode you run the risk of your camera wanting to expose dark area's as medium greys (when most of the frame is dimly light) so be aware of exposure compensation, i shoot manual raw,i will take a test shot of someone who is where the action is then check for blinking highlights and histogram, once your settings are adjusted you can then alter shutter speed/aperture depending on if there is more light or less light hitting the subjects,
    my usual aim is 1/100th sec but even at that speed the handshake might be blurred,its worth asking them to pose for a split sec while you get the shot,if its imperative that you get good shots then take control of the situation,dont be afraid to ask people to do things again if you missed the first time round,cheers martyn

  6. #6
    Fit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Minnesota USA
    Posts
    420
    Real Name
    Chris

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    Dave- I recently posted a very similar question. Perhaps there is some help for you here: I keep learning the hard way...

  7. #7
    rpcrowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    13,013
    Real Name
    Richard

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    You say that you are "I am tasked with shooting interior shots of people in motion." That is a bit ambiguous. Who tasked you to do this? That is an important facet of shooting what we used to call "grip and grin" photography. If the presenter or the presenter's organization has done the tasking, you have better control since you can communicate your photographic needs to the presenter.

    Try to initiate the presenter to pause in the handshake and face the camera. If a certificate is being presented have the presenter hold the certificate (or trophy) in the left hand and then shake with the right hand and have both faces looking at the camera.

    Bounced flash, especially using a difuser reflector such as the Joe Demb Flash Diffuser Pro (www.dembflashproducts.com) is way to shoot. The Flash Diffuser Pro has an articulating Flip-It reflector which can be adjusted for shooting in areas without ceilings off which to bounce. Often "available light" comes overhead. Using flash will fill in the shadows.

    If you MUST shoot available light without flash, I strongly suggest that you obtain another lens which has at least an f/2.8 aperture.

    Another thing of concern is the background. If you have any input (which you should have if the presenter/presenting organizaation has tasked the photography) try to arrange a non-cluttered background. A background that denotes the organization (such as a large wall plaque) is also nice if it doesn't interfere with the subject.

    This type of photography is not the most creative but, for many people, the "grip and grin" picture is an important memory marking a very important "rite of passage" in their life.

    By the way, IMO, you cannot effectively shoot this type of coverage using the LCD to view your shot. First, the LCD is considerably slower to focus and has a greater lag time and secondly it is difficult to see, when using the LCD, if eyes are closed at the time of the shot. On a 3" LCD, eyes are very-very tiny.

    Don't be shy about asking for a repeat shot. If you can, instruct the presenter that you will be shooting two images of each presentation and tell the presenter to hold the hand of the receiver until both shots are accomplished. The presenter is in control of the prsentation and if you have him or her on board with you, it is very easy to do a good job.
    Last edited by rpcrowe; 22nd January 2012 at 04:00 PM.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    66
    Real Name
    Dave

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    Thanks all to the great responses. I can use flash, I have a Canon Speedlight. And I've practiced a bit of bounce flash. But regarding shooting a few shots in quick succession - burst mode - to possibly get 1 out of the few to be the photo I want, will flash work in burst mode???

    I'm assuming I 'll have to push up ISO?

    Dave

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Nottingham.UK
    Posts
    409
    Real Name
    Martyn

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    i dont really use flash much so i cant answer precisely, my nikon speedlight has repeat mode that allows burst shots but i am pretty sure its a manual mode.cheers martyn

  10. #10
    rpcrowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    13,013
    Real Name
    Richard

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    Dave,

    Make sure you have fresh batteries in your flash. Sanyo Eneloop batteries will provide the fastest recharge times.

    Whether you can shoot in two shots burst mode using flash depends on: your flash model, the area in which you are shooting, your ISO, the distance between subject and camera and the aperture at which you are shooting etc.

    If you can't do burst mode, you can squeeze off two shots in quick succession. Instructing the presenter to wait for the second shot begroe he/she relaxes the hand shake would help.

    Obviously, the wider the aperture and higher the ISO, the less flash power is required and the quicker the recharge.

    I would definitely do some testing in an area comparative to whare you will be shooting. If the presenter is a high-rank muckedy-muck, then use a stand-in...

    If you are forced to shoot direct flash, I would recommend a flash bracket (such as the Stroboframe Camera Flip model) which will keep your flash directly over your camera and therefore cast the shadows low and behing the subjects.

    Here is an example of a shot done with bounced 550EX flash, Stroboframe Camera Flip bracket and a Joe Demb Flash Diffuser Pro. Although this is not a "grip and grin" image, it could easily be set up that way.

    Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Leiden, Netherlands
    Posts
    185
    Real Name
    Hero

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    Quote Originally Posted by acroreef View Post
    I seem to miss the handshake, get the people when their eyes are closed, etc. I am usually shooting single shot.
    Make sure you have focussed well before the handshake. For handshakes the groin area will usually do. Press the shutter-button halfway down so your camera focusses. Then fully press the shutter when the actual handshake occurs. Best moment is just before they let go again because many people look down at their hand when they initiate the handshake and will look like they have their eyes closed.
    You can try burst-mode but when using a flash it's not as fast as you might need. Typically hotshoe flashes will need a second or two to recharge. You might even try the build-in flash, on my Nikon D40 it charges faster then my Nissin DI622 does.

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    South Devon, UK
    Posts
    11,634

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    For most circumstances, flash is the obvious way to go. But if you aren't careful it can cause as many problems as it solves.

    Bouncing the flash is the traditional approach but it does need suitable surfaces and the correct distance between you and the action to get a good flash angle. There is always a risk that your maximum flash occurs behind your subject which actually puts them into shadow or the angle is so steep that you get dark eyes.

    With the old fixed output flash this was nearly always the best approach, but with modern variable output flashes, like the Speedlite, direct flash is more of a possibility. Particularly when using the ETTL flash mode and a bit of flash exposure compensation when required.

    In which case I would use much the same method which I use for wildlife. Set the camera manually to a suitable shutter speed and aperture to suit the scene. Bearing in mind the necessity to limit the shutter speed to the flash output max speed, or use the high speed flash option.

    When I first got my Speedlite, I was shooting with Tv or Av like I used to do with my old film flash and was usually disappointed with the results because the 'auto' part of those settings would select an aperture which was too open or too long a shutter speed.

    The ISO can be varied as required, which will need a little experimentation. So will any flash compensation; but a little bit of negative compensation usually prevents harsh tones or over exposed highlights.

    Whether you use some form of diffuser is also open to discussion but this also helps to prevent 'washed out' colour and harshness. If you don't use a diffuser I would strongly advise that a bit of negative compensation is used.

    After that, it is just a case of making sure that you get a couple of test shots before the 'real event' and get somebody else to act as a 'guinea pig'. After a while you will learn to recognise the correct settings as soon as you see the surroundings.

  13. #13
    William W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Sraylya
    Posts
    3,918
    Real Name
    William (call me Bill)

    Re: Interior Shots of People in Motion - Help Please

    With a 40D and the EF-S18~55 kit lens and Canon dedicated Speedlite (assuming a tilt swivel head) - the simplest method for an inexperienced Photographer to make grip and grin presentation photographs is to:

    Set the camera to P Mode and AF set to Half Depress Shutter

    Set ISO400~800 - (ISO800 will allow a quicker recycle time than ISO400 so use ISO800 if it is a quick moving line of prizes, etc)

    Set the Speedlite to Auto, / E-TTL

    Set the Speedlite to 45° and pull out the WHITE sleeve

    Set the zoom to about 24~35mm range

    Camera in Horizontal Orientation, Frame an HALF SHOT, but make sure the hands that are shaking, are well in frame.

    If the MC is not experienced with the Photography Etiquette, and does NOT direct the Recipient to face the camera, then, before taking the shot, the Photographer must attract the attention of the MC and the Recipient – a simple low voice – “thank you gentlemen” is all which is required.

    Both the MC and the Recipient will turn to the camera with their hands still gripped and or the award in place facing the camera.

    SHOOT.

    WW

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •