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Thread: Shooting in falling snow/flurries.

  1. #1

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    Bobo

    Shooting in falling snow/flurries.

    How would one go about doing this? Mostly handheld but could take along a tripod or monopod I suppose.

    For equipment protection - suggestions are to put the gear into a clear plastic bag. With the hood or without?

    If without a hood - will there be a significant impact on IQ with the plastic in front of the lens? I suppose there will be a bigger impact if the hood was left on?

    Thanks for your valuable advice.

  2. #2
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: Shooting in falling snow/flurries.

    Protection:

    The OPTECH Rainsleeve is a very low priced plastic cover for cameras and lenses. http://www.google.com/products/catal...ed=0CDUQ8gIwAQ
    At about six bucks it is the cheapest cover except for a plastic trash bag. However, it the Rainsleeve is light weight and I don't consider it a regular use cover. OTOH: I always carry a rainsleeve in the back pocket of my photo vest. It will protect the camera from blowing dust and sand as well as rain and snow,

    A more sturdy cover is the Kata http://www.adorama.com/KAE690.html

    I used a Kata cover for a ten day stint on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula when it rained every day. The Kata protected my camera just fine in weather like this...

    Shooting in falling snow/flurries.

    There is a Chinese copy of the Kata on eBay. Since I use a pair of cameras when I shoot, I purchased one of these also. It is quite good for the price and comes close to equalling tha Kata in quality.

    I would recommend using a lens hood and a protective filter...

  3. #3

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    Re: Shooting in falling snow/flurries.

    Thanks Richard.

    What I cannot make out is whether these sleeves cover or do not cover the glass at the front. But since you said filter, guess they do not.

  4. #4
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: Shooting in falling snow/flurries.

    Bobo asked: "What I cannot make out is whether these sleeves cover or do not cover the glass at the front."

    They do not cover the front of the lens. That is the advantage in using a lens hood and a filter. The lens hood will partially protect the lens and it is easier and safer to clean a filter than to clean the front element of the lens. The only thing which might cover the entire camera is some sort of underwater housing with an optical glass front. That would probably be overkill for snow shooting unless you fell into a snow bank with your camera.

    Some Canon camera/lens combinations are somewhat weather-proofed. However, even the weatherproofed lenses need a filter to be completely weatherproofed.

  5. #5

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    Re: Shooting in falling snow/flurries.

    Thanks for clearing that up Richard.

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