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Thread: 'Pushing Pixels'

  1. #1
    MajaMolly's Avatar
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    'Pushing Pixels'

    I think it was Colin that used this term in regards to printing large prints. I can't seem to grasp exactly what it means when it is said that the image is being viewed at 100%? Actually, I don't quite understanding zooming in and then cropping from the zoom? I hope I'm making sense.

    I use a Nikon D60. I have never printed more than a 5x7 (inches). I would like to print a 12x18 or so... Will I get a decent print?

    I'm sorry if I sound totally lost... It may be because I am.

  2. #2
    Mark Lawrence's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    If your image looks good at 100% then go ahead and print a 12x18 it should turn out just fine.And really the cost is minimal for the visual pleasure you will get.
    Just do it!

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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    Thank you, Mark. Here is my complete ignoranceWhat do you mean exactly when you say 100%?

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    Mark Lawrence's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    Look at your images only at 100% on your monitor. Any other magnification obscures the image's own sharpness and misleads you into comparing software algorithms instead of the actual images.

    In Photoshop or Lightroom
    Looking at camera images at 100% is usually much more magnification than printing an image. You'll see subtleties at 100% you'll never see in a print. You can see so much at 100% that you'll see many, many slight errors and sharpness-robbing effects that will never appear in print. You'll see so much that it's easy for anything other than absolutely perfect technique to degrade visible sharpness.

    Digital images viewed at 100% on-screen are much less forgiving of photographer errors than film cameras. Film requires a microscope. Digital gives the same level of analysis simply by going to 100% magnification in Photoshop. With film few people had microscopes: even picky photographers stopped at 8x or 20x loupes.

    At 100% magnification a typical 2006 digital camera makes an image which would be about 3 feet (1 meter) wide when seen in its entirety. Viewing at 100% is a very critical test of sharpness.

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    MajaMolly's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    Thank you, Mark. One last dumb question... when I'm in Photoshop or LR... how do I know what % of magnification I am viewing?

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    Loose Canon's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    There are no dumb questions, Maja.

    In Photoshop, down in the very bottom left corner will give you the % magnification. Just use your zoom tool to zoom in and out to whatever magnification you desire and look at the bottom left to see your present magnification.

    In case you haven't noticed already, when you choose say, the Unsharp Mask, its window will open giving you an automatic 100% magnification view. Move your mouse over the image in the workspace (not the USM pane). You will notice your cursor turns into a little square box. You can place this little viewing box anywhere on your image you want and that will show you that little area in the USM pane.

    You can move it to check haloing along edges, or wherever you want.

    Though I look at my images @ 100% (or more) for a lot of things (masking, sharpening, cloning, etc.) I usually find I like to zoom in and out quite a bit to get the "big picture".

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    MajaMolly's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    Terry- THANK YOU! I have wondered that for so long and was embarrassed to ask. You and Mark have helped me immensely. Thanks!

  8. #8
    Loose Canon's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    You are most welcome, Maja, and I'm glad I could help out a bit!

    Just ask away no matter what it may be. No need to feel embarrassed by anything.

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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    Hi,

    In Lightroom go to the "development" module. Press "D" for magnifying view (Should be default in this module). In the main windows the actual picture is fitted in. When you click on the image you will see it at 100% zoom. In the "navigator" pane 1:1 should be highlighted. After clicking again in the picture it is fitted into the main window again. In 1:1 view you can click-and-hold your left mouse button. The magnifying glas turns into a hand and the picture can be moved.

    Robert

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    arith's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    I think I got the question; first 5x7 isn't amateurs size, it is the size for kiddies that have their cheap photo's processed in a high street shop. 12 x 18 inches is substantially harder.

    Colin might say this is easy, but in fact some does abstract photo's like 24 minute water, which hasn't really got a lot of resolution.(can't have)

    You can with a modern printer GET sharp in the sense if you look close about a foot away from a 24" print largest size, it looks sharp with the right paper and ink.

    But a lot going on with Nyquist, the best possible ect ect.

    It is more fun than just trying for a computer image, and definitely harder as well. Unless you just take ordinary stuff following rules, high contrast feely images are difficult.

  11. #11
    MajaMolly's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    Quote Originally Posted by Loose Canon View Post
    You are most welcome, Maja, and I'm glad I could help out a bit!

    Just ask away no matter what it may be. No need to feel embarrassed by anything.
    Thank you.

  12. #12
    MajaMolly's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunray View Post
    Hi,

    In Lightroom go to the "development" module. Press "D" for magnifying view (Should be default in this module). In the main windows the actual picture is fitted in. When you click on the image you will see it at 100% zoom. In the "navigator" pane 1:1 should be highlighted. After clicking again in the picture it is fitted into the main window again. In 1:1 view you can click-and-hold your left mouse button. The magnifying glas turns into a hand and the picture can be moved.

    Robert
    Thanks a bunch, Robert. Step by step instructions work wonders!

  13. #13
    MajaMolly's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    Quote Originally Posted by arith View Post
    I think I got the question; first 5x7 isn't amateurs size, it is the size for kiddies that have their cheap photo's processed in a high street shop. 12 x 18 inches is substantially harder.

    Colin might say this is easy, but in fact some does abstract photo's like 24 minute water, which hasn't really got a lot of resolution.(can't have)

    You can with a modern printer GET sharp in the sense if you look close about a foot away from a 24" print largest size, it looks sharp with the right paper and ink.

    But a lot going on with Nyquist, the best possible ect ect.

    It is more fun than just trying for a computer image, and definitely harder as well. Unless you just take ordinary stuff following rules, high contrast feely images are difficult.
    Thank you, Steve. I didn't understand much of what you explained but that's a 'me' issue not you.

  14. #14
    Mark Lawrence's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    I hope you have figured out the 100% or(1:1)view.
    In Lightroom it is real easy.
    bring up a single image ,now down below the right hand bottom of your picture is a triangle.
    click it with your mouse,at the bottom click zoom which puts an arrow to the left of it.Okay now click your mouse anywhere to go back to you picture. Now below the center left you will find a slider move the slider till it reads 1:1.click your mouse on the picture it will fit the page. if you hold your mouse over your picture and click it this will zoom in and the slider will show 1:1 which is 100% click your mouse and hold and drag and you can move your way around the picture.
    I hope this will help you.
    Mark.

  15. #15
    MajaMolly's Avatar
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    Re: 'Pushing Pixels'

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Lawrence View Post
    I hope you have figured out the 100% or(1:1)view.
    In Lightroom it is real easy.
    bring up a single image ,now down below the right hand bottom of your picture is a triangle.
    click it with your mouse,at the bottom click zoom which puts an arrow to the left of it.Okay now click your mouse anywhere to go back to you picture. Now below the center left you will find a slider move the slider till it reads 1:1.click your mouse on the picture it will fit the page. if you hold your mouse over your picture and click it this will zoom in and the slider will show 1:1 which is 100% click your mouse and hold and drag and you can move your way around the picture.
    I hope this will help you.
    Mark.
    Thanks a bunch, Mark. That does help and is easy after reading your instructions!

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