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Thread: Cat girl

  1. #1

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    Peter

    Cat girl

    Cat girl

    My granddaughter with face paint. Shot indoors with available light which is why the ISO is so high (3200).

  2. #2

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    Re: Cat girl

    Hi Peter,

    Nice shot

    As we can all see, the noise from the high ISO mode has left the shot so noisy it's practically unuseable ...

    ... not! (sorry, little dry Kiwi "not" humour there!).

    Personally, I'd bump the exposure up about a stop - whack the brightness down about 1/2 a stop - and raise the black clipping point up just a tad - slight crop - and teeny output sharpen.

  3. #3

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    Peter

    Re: Cat girl

    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Southern View Post
    Hi Peter,

    Nice shot

    As we can all see, the noise from the high ISO mode has left the shot so noisy it's practically unuseable ...

    ... not! (sorry, little dry Kiwi "not" humour there!).

    Personally, I'd bump the exposure up about a stop - whack the brightness down about 1/2 a stop - and raise the black clipping point up just a tad - slight crop - and teeny output sharpen.
    Your wish is my command!

    Cat girl

  4. #4
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Just add 'MacKenzie'

    Re: Cat girl

    Good one, Peter.

    And the man's suggestions have worked again. But it was a well set up and executed shot in the first place.

  5. #5

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    Re: Cat girl

    Often I find that - with a "correct" exposure (ie 18% reflectivity smack bang in the middle of the histogram), the camera leaves about a stop of headroom between the highlights and the saturation point of the sensor ... so typically (in post production) I'll bump up the exposure about 1 stop. This in turn make the midtones (ie skin) look ghastly, but the brightness slider brings them back into line ... and then it's just the black point to kill any residual flatness in the low to mid tones. It's one of my "shoot like a pro" secrets (but don't tell anyone!)

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