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Thread: Cinemagraph Experiment

  1. #1
    FrankMi's Avatar
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    Cinemagraph Experiment

    This is the first time I've tried to do a Cinemagraph. In this case I had 24 hand-held shots of bubbling thermal pool to play with. The first thing I discovered is how quickly the process of creating a cinemagraph can explode into files that easily exceed 200MB.

    I would have likely been better off using a video file taken with my camera and I'll likely try that as my next approach. For this experiment I needed to get all 24 images aligned in PS using Edit/Auto-Align Layers.
    I knew that until I could isolate the part(s) of the image that would be in motion that I needed to avoid the desire to do any cropping and image adjustments as all changes of the nature would have to perfectly align across 24 images. So here are the steps I took:
    1. Decided on an image to use as the base for the scene. The remaining images would be used just for the boiling water action.
    2. Masked the part of the image that would have motion.
    3. Copy the mask to all of the images.
    4. Sorted the images into a logical sequence using mainly the height and intensity of the water boils but also the coloring, wave size and amount of steam produced.
    5. Blended each of the 24 masks to match each other and to base image.
    The next step was to test the animation process in PS Window/Animation. Here I found that the most practical approach was to use the following options in the drop-down menu:
    1. Make Frames from Layers
    2. Select the baseline image – Match Layer Across Frames. This copies the base image to all the frames as all other frames are just the masked boiling water from each layer.
    3. Select All Frames – right click and set a display time of about 0.1 seconds per frame.
    4. Select each frame, one at a time and add 5 ‘transition’ frames using ‘Tween’.
    After testing to see how it looks, the lase step is to use File/Save for Web & Devices.
    This caused the PC to lock up for over an hour as it tried to render the Gif file. I couldn’t get it to render until I made enough reductions in the file size to be able produce a 10MB GIF!
    I was eventually able to get the file size to just under a MB by using just 8 of the original 24 images, reducing the image to 768 Pixels across and reducing the PPI to 72.
    Has anyone else tried to create a cinemagraph? If so, how did you make out?

    Cinemagraph Experiment

    Obviously I need to get the file MUCH smaller!

  2. #2
    Kris V's Avatar
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    Re: Cinemagraph Experiment

    I admire your patience, Frank, but I think I will use a video camera if I ever get the inclination of doing something similar.
    There is some movement back and forth that make me go cross-eyed if I look to long.
    I like the original - basically because it doesn't have a frame or border around it.
    Just my 2 cents.
    Last edited by Kris V; 4th October 2011 at 01:05 PM.

  3. #3

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    Re: Cinemagraph Experiment

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankMi View Post
    This is the first time I've tried to do a Cinemagraph. In this case I had 24 hand-held shots of bubbling thermal pool to play with. The first thing I discovered is how quickly the process of creating a cinemagraph can explode into files that easily exceed 200MB.

    I would have likely been better off using a video file taken with my camera and I'll likely try that as my next approach. For this experiment I needed to get all 24 images aligned in PS using Edit/Auto-Align Layers.
    I knew that until I could isolate the part(s) of the image that would be in motion that I needed to avoid the desire to do any cropping and image adjustments as all changes of the nature would have to perfectly align across 24 images. So here are the steps I took:
    1. Decided on an image to use as the base for the scene. The remaining images would be used just for the boiling water action.
    2. Masked the part of the image that would have motion.
    3. Copy the mask to all of the images.
    4. Sorted the images into a logical sequence using mainly the height and intensity of the water boils but also the coloring, wave size and amount of steam produced.
    5. Blended each of the 24 masks to match each other and to base image.
    The next step was to test the animation process in PS Window/Animation. Here I found that the most practical approach was to use the following options in the drop-down menu:
    1. Make Frames from Layers
    2. Select the baseline image – Match Layer Across Frames. This copies the base image to all the frames as all other frames are just the masked boiling water from each layer.
    3. Select All Frames – right click and set a display time of about 0.1 seconds per frame.
    4. Select each frame, one at a time and add 5 ‘transition’ frames using ‘Tween’.
    After testing to see how it looks, the lase step is to use File/Save for Web & Devices.
    This caused the PC to lock up for over an hour as it tried to render the Gif file. I couldn’t get it to render until I made enough reductions in the file size to be able produce a 10MB GIF!
    I was eventually able to get the file size to just under a MB by using just 8 of the original 24 images, reducing the image to 768 Pixels across and reducing the PPI to 72.
    Has anyone else tried to create a cinemagraph? If so, how did you make out?

    Cinemagraph Experiment

    Obviously I need to get the file MUCH smaller!
    I have done effect like this in Adobe After effect and it just takes few seconds

    a ) Base Still Image

    rest 15 / 20 frames of video... created suitable mask will take two seconds exported as GIF
    Last edited by Ashwin; 4th October 2011 at 01:27 PM.

  4. #4
    FrankMi's Avatar
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    Re: Cinemagraph Experiment

    Hi Kris, the purpose of the cinemagraph is to introduce a hint of movement into a still image, similar to what Jamie Back has done with http://www.amusingplanet.com/2011/04...otography.html. But, you are correct. It is likely easier to introduce a short looping video to the image than to do it the way I have.
    Cinemagraph Experiment

  5. #5
    FrankMi's Avatar
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    Re: Cinemagraph Experiment

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashwin View Post
    I have done effect like this in Adobe After effect and it just takes few seconds

    a ) Base Still Image

    rest 15 / 20 frames of video... created suitable mask will take two seconds exported as GIF
    Hi Ashwin, I don't think I could afford the cost of Adobe After Effect just for this experiment but I may try again with a bit of DSLR video which I should be able to incorporate within Photoshop.
    Cinemagraph Experiment

  6. #6
    Kris V's Avatar
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    Re: Cinemagraph Experiment

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankMi View Post
    Hi Kris, the purpose of the cinemagraph is to introduce a hint of movement into a still image, similar to what Jamie Back has done with http://www.amusingplanet.com/2011/04...otography.html. But, you are correct. It is likely easier to introduce a short looping video to the image than to do it the way I have.
    Cinemagraph Experiment
    Yea, I saw her website. Pretty impressive, but I really can't bring up the patience to even try.
    Admire yours for getting so adventurous!

  7. #7

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    Re: Cinemagraph Experiment

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankMi View Post
    Hi Ashwin, I don't think I could afford the cost of Adobe After Effect just for this experiment but I may try again with a bit of DSLR video which I should be able to incorporate within Photoshop.
    Cinemagraph Experiment
    Yes, it can be done in Photoshop, and you have done correctly..., but it will take little time, whereas if you have After effect, it can be done very easily.,

  8. #8

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    Have a guess :)

    Re: Cinemagraph Experiment

    I might have to give these a try

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