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Thread: Fan-top Saguaro

  1. #1
    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Fan-top Saguaro

    I'm determined to improve my skills and techniques for B&W images, so I expect to be posting more in the coming weeks. This image is fairly simple, but I'd really appreciate some no-holds-barred critique on this. Thanks!

    Fan-top Saguaro

    (In case you're wondering, no one knows why some saguaro grow this way. It's not all that common, but not really rare, either.)

  2. #2
    ucci's Avatar
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    Ken Outch

    Re: Fan-top Saguaro

    Well, you seem to have gotten off to a good start in your quest! Seems well framed and draws the eye in and up the central subject. Nice work.
    Ken

  3. #3
    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Re: Fan-top Saguaro

    Thanks, Ken. When I took this shot, I thought I would be able to draw out more texture, but it just isn't there. I may try a reshoot earlier in the morning (or later in the year) for better light.

  4. #4
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Fan-top Saguaro

    Al - what I like about it is its simplicity. The plant has a lot of texture and details and that's what needs to be concentrated upon. And you have made that happen by setting it against an absolutely clear sky. And that really works. I think it's a very powerful and interesting image. I think you're conversion is just right for the subject.

  5. #5
    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Re: Fan-top Saguaro

    Quote Originally Posted by Donald View Post
    Al - what I like about it is its simplicity. The plant has a lot of texture and details and that's what needs to be concentrated upon. And you have made that happen by setting it against an absolutely clear sky. And that really works. I think it's a very powerful and interesting image. I think you're conversion is just right for the subject.
    Thanks, Don. I've admired your work ever since I joined CiC, so your opinion is greatly valued (no offense, Ken... all feedback is appreciated but I'm a big fan of Don's photos). I hope you'll be kind enough to point me in the right direction when I get it wrong.

  6. #6
    rpcrowe's Avatar
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    Re: Fan-top Saguaro

    I love the texture and the lighting on this image. I wonder, however, if a one degree clockwise rotation might not be in order?

  7. #7
    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Re: Fan-top Saguaro

    Quote Originally Posted by rpcrowe View Post
    I love the texture and the lighting on this image. I wonder, however, if a one degree clockwise rotation might not be in order?
    Thanks, Richard.

    You may be right about the rotation, but I have difficulty determining "vertical" with these plants, especially when there are no other references in the image. There really isn't any line or edge on this plant that can be reliably used. It's just a matter of judging the plant as a whole (and sometimes that doesn't work, either, as different people will use different lines or parts of the plant to judge). I used grid lines to help judge this one during cropping, but as I said, it still may look askew.

  8. #8
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    Re: Fan-top Saguaro

    From hanging around the Sonoran desert, I seem to recall that this anomaly found in the saguaro is known as a cristate, or is this just a pesky cactus giving the photographer the middle finger?

    Seriously, though, a very successful shot. The lines are strong and crisp, creating fascinating patterns. Congratulations!

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