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Thread: Baler Problems - More Agricultural Machinery

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    South Devon, UK
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    Baler Problems - More Agricultural Machinery

    I was walking along a footpath through farmland when I saw an engineer working on a broken down baler.

    Just a little micro adjustment is needed.

    Baler Problems - More Agricultural Machinery

    Compare the grease stained clothing of the farmer with the boffin's immaculate pale shorts; plus matching legs.

    Test Run

    Baler Problems - More Agricultural Machinery

    Success

    Baler Problems - More Agricultural Machinery

    Not much of a sky I'm afraid. And the new Class machinery really is that dirty yellowish colour. I suppose they think it doesn't show the muck splashes.
    Last edited by Geoff F; 13th July 2011 at 05:54 PM. Reason: Photos added

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Canada
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    Real Name
    Wendy

    Re: Baler Problems - More Agricultural Machinery

    Interesting shots Geoff. I like the second shot where it shows what I assume to be the way the bales were coming out before the "micro" adjustment. How long did it take the "boffin" to perform his magic? (BTW, what is a boffin?, I sort of can imply by the context, but just to make sure)

    Wendy

  3. #3

    Join Date
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    Re: Baler Problems - More Agricultural Machinery

    Firstly, Wendy, a Boffin is a UK term for a technical expert. It possibly goes back to some Dickensean roots but the term was widely used for military personel with expert technical knowledge during WW II. Some of their designs were brilliant; others however . . .

    And yes, there were a couple of bundles of failed bales around the field. The expert repair didn't quite work the first time, and it quickly came to a grinding, clunking halt. After which he sorted out the problem and rode on the top of the ladder for a little while so that he could watch the operation.

    I suppose everything was sorted within 30 minutes. But, including call out charges, I don't suppose there was any profit left from that rather small field.

    They are somewhat 'old fashioned' sized fields on the cliff top and come under the control of a National Environmental Organisation; although a number of small farms are run on commercial lines.

    Mostly pasture or low growing, wind resistant, cereals. Some sheep are grazed but after a number of dog attacks most farmers seem to be including more cattle now.

    It is certainly a different design of baler compared with the 'traditional' models. And the bales are twice the size.

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