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Thread: Cullernose Point with long exposure + HDR treatment

  1. #1
    New Member Quix Photography's Avatar
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    Sue Baker

    Cullernose Point with long exposure + HDR treatment

    Got more than my feet wet on this photo shoot!

    One of my first beach shots using my adjustable ND filter and only just started playing around with HDR.

    Used Picturenaut 3.0 for HDR conversion with 3 versions of the RAW shot (exposure comp = -3, 0, +3). The ND filter is adjustable up to 8 stops... there is no guide on the lens so at a rough guess think this was taken at 6 or 7 stops.

    Exif info:
    Canon EOS 350D
    f/16 @ 15 sec exposure
    ISO 400
    18mm focal length

    Let me know what you think - any tips for using ND filter / HDR gratefully received

    Cullernose Point with long exposure + HDR treatment
    Cullernose-Point by Quixic, on Flickr

  2. #2

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    Re: Cullernose Point with long exposure + HDR treatment

    Hi,
    Bettering a few the sky

    Cullernose Point with long exposure + HDR treatment

  3. #3
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Cullernose Point with long exposure + HDR treatment

    Sue

    I am not very well informed on the detail of the debate on what HDR is or is not. It's not soemthing I'm involved in, so don't pay too much attention. It's an area that generates much discussion and debate.

    I think most folks would consider that making 3 versions of the same photo is not what HDR is about. Instead it's something that creates a psuedo HDR process. Nothing wrong with that, it's just that many feel we need to get the terminology right. I think one of the key questions people ask is: If all the detail was there already in one frame, why do we have the need to create 3 versions of it? HDR is designed to capture the same scene at different exposures value so that would otherwise be lost can be captured and then merged into one image.

    All of that being said, the secret of good HDR process work is to not know it was used. And you have achieved that.

    For my taste, it's gone too dark on the left and right hand edges and some dodging would bring back a bit of the detail. But this, of course, is the effect that you may have wanted. I like the light on the rocks.
    Last edited by Donald; 31st May 2011 at 07:45 AM.

  4. #4
    FrankMi's Avatar
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    Re: Cullernose Point with long exposure + HDR treatment

    Hi Sue. Nice shot that creates a somber mood.

    Hi Donald. I don't want to start an HDR discussion that takes away from helping Sue but I would like to try to being some clarity to a much misunderstood topic.

    Based on Wikipedia's definition, HDR is "a set of techniques that allow a greater dynamic range of luminance between the lightest and darkest areas of an image than current standard digital imaging techniques or photographic methods." This usually requires multiple exposures but I feel the essence of the term HDR is any process that captures detail (usually in highlights and shadows) that can't be seen when using typical image rendering processes. What is 'typical' changes over time as technology improves. For me, if you need to apply one or more techniques to recover highlight and shadow details that would otherwise be lost, then I would consider the scene to have high dynamic range.

    I cannot tell if Sue's scene could be rendered properly without the use of three versions of the same image, but it is clear that the one below by Trey Ratcliff of StuckinCustoms.com could not. His image is from a single Raw file that he applied techniques similar to what Sue is doing.

    Cullernose Point with long exposure + HDR treatment

    I hope this helps!
    Last edited by FrankMi; 31st May 2011 at 01:13 PM.

  5. #5
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Cullernose Point with long exposure + HDR treatment

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankMi View Post
    For me, if you need to apply one or more techniques to recover highlight and shadow details that would otherwise be lost, then I would consider the scene to have high dynamic range.
    Frank

    Exactly

    Like you, I don't want to divert attention away from Sue's image. But the point is that if you need to apply a technique to recover highlight and shadow details, then it must be the case that the highlight and shadow details could not be captured within one image. If they can be captured within one image, then they do not need to be recovered.

    I have no issue with the fact that one may make multiple images of the same frame at different settings to achieve an artistic effect. Fine.

    But that, surely, is about accentuating or diminishing the tone at one or other end of the spectrum, not increasing the dynamic range.

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