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Thread: Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

  1. #1
    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

    Photos for C&C. Your comments (and especially criticism) are always welcome.

    The ruins of Windsor Mansion are located just south of Port Gibson, MS. The mansion was completed in 1861, and survived the war, but was destroyed by an accidental fire in 1890. Mark Twain enjoyed visiting Windsor, and compared the mansion to a college instead of a residence, because of it's size and Greek revival architecture.

    #1 For some reason, a B&W is almost required for shots of ruins.
    Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

    #2 Column Bases. The columns are 45 ft. tall.
    Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

    #3 Twenty-nine columns remain standing. Most of the surviving ironwork has been moved to nearby Alcorn State University.
    Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

    #4
    Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

  2. #2
    Moderator Donald's Avatar
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    Re: Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

    Al

    I think that the tight cropping on the composition of the last one works really well. It's another of these where you realise that you don't need to stand back to get the whole structure in the frame in order to be able to tell the story in an image. There are nice lines taking us through from front to back.

    I would suggest that the B&W needs more contrast (perhaps more local contrast enhancement) to give it 'pop'. I tend to like fairly low contrast images, but I think this subject needs to have it pretty high. I's also want to clone out that twig gropwing out of teh top of the right hand pillar.

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    Re: Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

    I like #4 the very best! Sometimes in photography, less is more and closer croppings win...

    Port Gibson is the old home of my CROW ancestors in the Pre-Civil War days...

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    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Re: Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

    Quote Originally Posted by Donald View Post
    Al

    I think that the tight cropping on the composition of the last one works really well. It's another of these where you realise that you don't need to stand back to get the whole structure in the frame in order to be able to tell the story in an image. There are nice lines taking us through from front to back.

    I would suggest that the B&W needs more contrast (perhaps more local contrast enhancement) to give it 'pop'. I tend to like fairly low contrast images, but I think this subject needs to have it pretty high. I's also want to clone out that twig gropwing out of teh top of the right hand pillar.
    Thanks, Donald. I know what you mean about the twig at the top of the pillar, but for some inexplicable reason, I like it. I'm sure nearly everyone will agree with you, and I know I should remove it, but I allow myself a guilty pleasure now and then. You have a good point about the contrast, though.

    I wish I'd had a WA lens for this location, but alas, I expected to be shooting graduation pictures and portraits on this trip....

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    Snarkbyte's Avatar
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    Re: Windsor Ruins (no, not THAT Windsor...)

    Quote Originally Posted by rpcrowe View Post
    I like #4 the very best! Sometimes in photography, less is more and closer croppings win...

    Port Gibson is the old home of my CROW ancestors in the Pre-Civil War days...
    Thanks for your comments, Richard. U. S. Grant called Port Gibson "too beautiful to burn", and it really is a beautiful area. Unfortunately, much of the area was underwater from the flooding, and some considerable detours were necessary to get to Windsor.

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