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Thread: A bridge over water

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    Marie Hass's Avatar
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    A bridge over water

    I took this series for a manual exposure class. I have done no pp, other than some sharpening. Please make comment.

    Boys, a bridge and water - a game of what comes next
    A bridge over water

    A bridge over water

    A bridge over water

    A bridge over water

    A bridge over water
    Last edited by Marie Hass; 25th May 2011 at 01:00 AM.

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    Re: A bridge over water

    I think you did very good in controlling the exposure on this series, Marie. I'll give you a more practical tip - Did you notice that thick lush bright green areas of the leaves in the background? That is the natural color of green and that is almost middle gray! Whenever you see green in that shade of color ( not the dark or the dull colored ones) you can never sway away from a well exposed shot if you aim the camera's spot meter to that area. You did very good in this exercise, Marie. Good job!
    Last edited by jiro; 25th May 2011 at 01:38 AM.

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    Marie Hass's Avatar
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    Re: A bridge over water

    Thank you, Willie. Sometimes it is good to do less, than more, to our pictures. The antics of these kids made me laugh and giggle. I so enjoyed the infectious joy of these young men.

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    Re: A bridge over water

    I think the last photo could do with a slight clockwise rotation, going by the distant verticals.

    Shooting a moving subject in a mixture of bright sunshine and deep shadow is never easy so I think these have come out very well.

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    Marie Hass's Avatar
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    Re: A bridge over water

    A few questions, Willie -
    I'll give you a more practical tip - Did you notice that thick lush bright green areas of the leaves in the background? That is the natural color of green and that is almost middle gray! Whenever you see green in that shade of color ( not the dark or the dull colored ones) you can never sway away from a well exposed shot if you aim the camera's spot meter to that area.
    I did not know that, nor did I know about middle gray and spot metering. Are you also suggesting use of spot metering rather than matrix (evaluative)?

    Geoff -
    photo could do with a slight clockwise rotation, going by the distant verticals
    The signs in the background are distinctly veering CCW. All of them. I will also need to adjust my hold so I have less of a problem. Thank you.

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    jiro's Avatar
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    Re: A bridge over water

    I did not know that, nor did I know about middle gray and spot metering. Are you also suggesting use of spot metering rather than matrix (evaluative)?
    Nikon and Canon's Evaluative or Matrix Metering is so good that you can actually leave your camera at this setting 90% of the time. However, if you are unsure and you're in a large field with thick green meadows, aim your spot meter at the green areas and you're not going to get lost with your exposure. Try it.
    Last edited by jiro; 26th May 2011 at 11:39 AM.

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    Re: A bridge over water

    Quote Originally Posted by jiro View Post
    Nikon and Canon's Evaluative or Matrix Metering is so good that you can actually leave your camera at this setting 90% of the time.
    It's great when a scene is reflective, but in instances where there's a degree of backlighting or strong specular reflections, they tend to try to protect the highlights, which can under-expose subjects. Not saying it's a bad thing - just the way it works. I think the key to it all is simply understanding how metering works so the best technique can be applied in each circumstance.

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    Marie Hass's Avatar
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    Re: A bridge over water

    Wille -
    large field with thick green meadows
    We have a big lush field of beautiful timothy hay. I will run through the metering modes with the new camera and check out the differences.

    Colin -
    they tend to protect the highlights, which can under-expose the subjects.
    I have experienced the results of this statement, but never heard the concept stated so well. Thank you for providing me with that ah-ha moment.

    Marie

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    Re: A bridge over water

    Quote Originally Posted by Marie Hass View Post
    Colin - I have experienced the results of this statement, but never heard the concept stated so well. Thank you for providing me with that ah-ha moment.

    Marie
    No worries Marie,

    With digital captures, there's is a LOT more leeway on the under-exposure side than the over-exposure side - so that camera tends to "Err on the side of caution".

    The nice thing about manual mode though is once you have the exposure correct, it'll give you great consistency for a given lighting condition, which make post-processing a lot easier if you're doing a series like this. Metering is pretty simple when you understand it - and very inconsistent if you don't - so just ask if there's anythig you need to know.

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